Mirror City Timelapse (by Michael Shainblum)

When I first started Mirror City, I wanted to create a video that was completely out of the norm. I wanted to showcase something unique and artistic, which takes Timelapse photography into a more abstract direction. Mirror City is a visual story through some of the great American cities: Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. These clips were all processed from their original form, into the kaleidoscopic visuals that you see in this video. Many people visit these large cities every day, and all of these places have been shot and filmed, but I wanted to emulate these urban landscapes in a way that nobody has even seen before. I wanted to put man-made geometric shapes, mixed with elements of color and movement to create less of a structured video, and more of a plethora of visual stimulation.

via Vincent Laforet

Learn how to finally create stunning photography books from accomplished book creator, publisher, and editor Rex Weiner, and our ace Adobe instructor Andy Graber. We start with a brief presentation from Rex, exploring the ins and outs of making outstanding photography books; from initial concept to choosing fonts, to editing and sequencing and the role they play in your project, to printing and promotion. Then Andy will show how to build your project in A&I’s easy to use page layout software, BookCreator. Andy is an expert at presenting software and he will walk you through the process, and have you making your own book this weekend! Special emphasis will be placed on making good design choices, and how to present your photographs in the best possible way.”


Household objects also offer many possibilities for abstract images. The word “abstract” can mean many things. In photography, it often refers to images in which the subject is not readily recognizable. The opening image, for example, is a photograph of the shadows cast by a decorative glass bowl and a prism. It’s actually as representative as a portrait or a mug shot. Because a viewer doesn’t know what is being represented, however, we deem such images abstracts.

Take a look at our latest blog post on Still Lifes and Abstracts. High-res

Household objects also offer many possibilities for abstract images. The word “abstract” can mean many things. In photography, it often refers to images in which the subject is not readily recognizable. The opening image, for example, is a photograph of the shadows cast by a decorative glass bowl and a prism. It’s actually as representative as a portrait or a mug shot. Because a viewer doesn’t know what is being represented, however, we deem such images abstracts.

Take a look at our latest blog post on Still Lifes and Abstracts.


"In reality, we didn’t set out to build a festival. We set out to build a village—a photographic village—where everyone feels welcome and sits down for a beer or some meatballs, and a hearty discussion on the state of photography or the latest camera gear. We’re proud to say that the response from the community has been incredible. People came out in droves, saw powerful photography, hung out, and perhaps most important, they had a great time doing it."

We talked to Sam Barzilay on showcasing photos in shipping containers, which was a big hit at Photoville this summer. Take a look at what he had to say. High-res

"In reality, we didn’t set out to build a festival. We set out to build a village—a photographic village—where everyone feels welcome and sits down for a beer or some meatballs, and a hearty discussion on the state of photography or the latest camera gear. We’re proud to say that the response from the community has been incredible. People came out in droves, saw powerful photography, hung out, and perhaps most important, they had a great time doing it."

We talked to Sam Barzilay on showcasing photos in shipping containers, which was a big hit at Photoville this summer. Take a look at what he had to say.

The photographer’s most important and likewise most difficult task is not learning to manage his camera, or to develop, or to print. It is learning to see photographically.

Edward Weston (1886-1958, photographer)

This Week in Photography History: Birth of Beaumont Newhall, considered the father of photography history, on June 22, 1908. A photographer in his own right, he is best known as the founding director of the Museum of Modern Art’s photography department. He received this position in 1940 after curating MOMA’s first comprehensive retrospective of photography, titled “Photography 1839-1937” and featuring 800 works, in 1937. While MOMA had featured two exhibits by individual photographers before, Newhall’s show was a total account of photography as both technique and art, and was accompanied by his seminal work, titled “The History of Photography,” on the first hundred years of photography. He then served as curator and director of the George Eastman House, later the International Museum of Photography, until retirement.

This Week in Photography History: Birth of Beaumont Newhall, considered the father of photography history, on June 22, 1908. A photographer in his own right, he is best known as the founding director of the Museum of Modern Art’s photography department. He received this position in 1940 after curating MOMA’s first comprehensive retrospective of photography, titled “Photography 1839-1937” and featuring 800 works, in 1937. While MOMA had featured two exhibits by individual photographers before, Newhall’s show was a total account of photography as both technique and art, and was accompanied by his seminal work, titled “The History of Photography,” on the first hundred years of photography. He then served as curator and director of the George Eastman House, later the International Museum of Photography, until retirement.


"When I ask my students to name a favorite photographer, 75 percent say Ansel Adams.
Really? That many of you relate so closely to a black and white, large format, traditional landscape photographer from forty years ago? Or is it because he is the most well known and easily named photographer of our time? When I jump to the next question, “Why do you like Ansel Adams?” I hear crickets chirping, dead silence.
"Uh, because it’s pretty?"

(via Other than Ansel | BH Insights) High-res

"When I ask my students to name a favorite photographer, 75 percent say Ansel Adams.

Really? That many of you relate so closely to a black and white, large format, traditional landscape photographer from forty years ago? Or is it because he is the most well known and easily named photographer of our time? When I jump to the next question, “Why do you like Ansel Adams?” I hear crickets chirping, dead silence.

"Uh, because it’s pretty?"

(via Other than Ansel | BH Insights)