This Week in Photography
The birth of Paul Strand on October 16th 1890. Strand, who died in 1976, was an American photographer and filmmaker who helped establish photography as an art form in the early 20th century. His work was promoted by Alfred Stieglitz in the 291 gallery. He was the brain behind films like Manhatta, Redes, and was involved in The Plow That Broke the Plains and Native Land. He is well known for his photos of movement in the city, abstracts, and street portraits.
Photo via PDN and the Aperture Foundation High-res

This Week in Photography

The birth of Paul Strand on October 16th 1890. Strand, who died in 1976, was an American photographer and filmmaker who helped establish photography as an art form in the early 20th century. His work was promoted by Alfred Stieglitz in the 291 gallery. He was the brain behind films like Manhatta, Redes, and was involved in The Plow That Broke the Plains and Native Land. He is well known for his photos of movement in the city, abstracts, and street portraits.

Photo via PDN and the Aperture Foundation

This Week in Photography History: “You press the button, we do the rest,” George Eastman promised buyers of his Kodak box camera, patented September 4, 1888. Loaded with Eastman’s flexible, rolled film, far less bulky than glass plates, the easy-to-use $25 camera and its clever marketing made photography a medium for the masses. Users mailed the whole box to Kodak to get back their snapshots along with a reloaded camera, ready to click.

This Week in Photography History: “You press the button, we do the rest,” George Eastman promised buyers of his Kodak box camera, patented September 4, 1888. Loaded with Eastman’s flexible, rolled film, far less bulky than glass plates, the easy-to-use $25 camera and its clever marketing made photography a medium for the masses. Users mailed the whole box to Kodak to get back their snapshots along with a reloaded camera, ready to click.

This Week in Photography History
Death of Margaret Bourke-White on August 27, 1971. She set many firsts as both photographer and female, becoming the first foreign photographer allowed to shoot in the Soviet Union, the first female war correspondent and combat zone photographer, and the first Life magazine female photographer. She started shooting as a young girl and graduated from Cornell in 1927. Her initial clients included industrial giants, for whom she solved the problems of lighting under conditions of intense heat and flame. Her career then moved to Fortune and Life magazines, while pursuing other projects on the side, including shooting the India-Pakistan conflict and an iconic portrait of Ghandi. 

This Week in Photography History

Death of Margaret Bourke-White on August 27, 1971. She set many firsts as both photographer and female, becoming the first foreign photographer allowed to shoot in the Soviet Union, the first female war correspondent and combat zone photographer, and the first Life magazine female photographer. She started shooting as a young girl and graduated from Cornell in 1927. Her initial clients included industrial giants, for whom she solved the problems of lighting under conditions of intense heat and flame. Her career then moved to Fortune and Life magazines, while pursuing other projects on the side, including shooting the India-Pakistan conflict and an iconic portrait of Ghandi. 

This Week in Photography History
Death of Alfred Eisenstaedt, a celebrated German refugee photographer, on August 24, 1995. Alfred Eisenstaedt emigrated from Germany to the US in 1935 to escape Nazi oppression and is most famous for his beautiful images of WWII Victory Day in Times Square, celebrating the triumph of peace over war and good over evil. 

This Week in Photography History

Death of Alfred Eisenstaedt, a celebrated German refugee photographer, on August 24, 1995. Alfred Eisenstaedt emigrated from Germany to the US in 1935 to escape Nazi oppression and is most famous for his beautiful images of WWII Victory Day in Times Square, celebrating the triumph of peace over war and good over evil. 

This Week in Photography History
Birth of Willy Ronis, documenter of pre and post WWII France, on August 14, 1910. His parents fled persecution in Eastern Europe for France, and while Willy hoped to follow in his mother’s musical footsteps, he was forced to take over the family portrait photography business when his father became ill. His images portray his love for music, the worker’s cause and the post-war recovery in Paris and Provence, such as this image of a “Wine Grower of Gironde” returning to business as usual in 1945.

This Week in Photography History

Birth of Willy Ronis, documenter of pre and post WWII France, on August 14, 1910. His parents fled persecution in Eastern Europe for France, and while Willy hoped to follow in his mother’s musical footsteps, he was forced to take over the family portrait photography business when his father became ill. His images portray his love for music, the worker’s cause and the post-war recovery in Paris and Provence, such as this image of a “Wine Grower of Gironde” returning to business as usual in 1945.

This Week in Photography History
Death of Vittorio Sella, mountaineering photographer, on August 12, 1943. His work focused on shooting mountain peaks and glaciers at high altitudes, and was praised by Ansel Adams as inspiring “a definitely religious awe.” Sella created his sharp images by climbing mountains with a team hauling a 40 lbs. wooden Dallmeyer camera and tripod and a pile of 12x15 inches glass plates, coating the glass with chemicals on location.  High-res

This Week in Photography History

Death of Vittorio Sella, mountaineering photographer, on August 12, 1943. His work focused on shooting mountain peaks and glaciers at high altitudes, and was praised by Ansel Adams as inspiring “a definitely religious awe.” Sella created his sharp images by climbing mountains with a team hauling a 40 lbs. wooden Dallmeyer camera and tripod and a pile of 12x15 inches glass plates, coating the glass with chemicals on location. 

This Week in Photography History
On July 16, 1926, National Geographic magazine published the first underwater color photographs. This shot of a hogfish was taken by staff photographer Charles Martin on a trip to the Florida Keys in the Gulf of Mexico with ichthyologist Dr. William Longley. The pair pioneered underwater photography by trailing a raft filled with highly explosive magnesium flash powder. Encased in underwater housing standard for the time, the camera’s shutter was rigged to trigger an explosion of a pound of this powder, illuminating the sea with the equivalent of 2400 flashbulbs to a depth of fifteen feet. Longley had invented the magnesium powder solution for lighting, and Martin created a more sensitive chemical coating for the Autochrome plate, the only reliable plate for color photography, that reduced exposure time from one second to 1/20. High-res

This Week in Photography History

On July 16, 1926, National Geographic magazine published the first underwater color photographs. This shot of a hogfish was taken by staff photographer Charles Martin on a trip to the Florida Keys in the Gulf of Mexico with ichthyologist Dr. William Longley. The pair pioneered underwater photography by trailing a raft filled with highly explosive magnesium flash powder. Encased in underwater housing standard for the time, the camera’s shutter was rigged to trigger an explosion of a pound of this powder, illuminating the sea with the equivalent of 2400 flashbulbs to a depth of fifteen feet. Longley had invented the magnesium powder solution for lighting, and Martin created a more sensitive chemical coating for the Autochrome plate, the only reliable plate for color photography, that reduced exposure time from one second to 1/20.